Blog

Measurement through the consumer lens

During my tenure at South Africa’s National Treasury, the discussions around financial inclusion often focused on seemingly straightforward questions: What is the state of financial inclusion in the country? What are the most critical areas requiring policy interventions? What targets are appropriate for what we want to achieve? How will we measure progress towards these targets? How will we evaluate the impact of our work when we reach, or don’t reach, these targets?

Then and now: Shaping our latest tools in financial inclusion

(Editor’s note: This is the first in a three-part series.)   “We shape our tools and thereafter our tools shape us” – Marshall McLuhan   In 2010, the leaders of the G20 launched the Global Partnership for Financial Inclusion (GPFI) at the G20 Summit in Seoul. It was a watershed moment for financial inclusion, which had evolved from a grassroots microfinance movement in the 1980s to a mainstream development agenda

Delivering on the promise of digitising payments in Zambia

Digital financial inclusion holds great promise. A McKinsey report last year found that digital finance could add up to $3.7 trillion to the GDP of emerging economies within a decade. A recent blog from the World Bank explains that the biggest impact from financial inclusion comes from digital payments and savings accounts. Studies on digitising cash payments in Brazil, South Africa and Mexico all find significant efficiency gains from digitising payments for governments and their service providers.

Cash is king for Africans sending money from the UK

The way we stay in touch, do our shopping, and even the ways in which some of us find love, have all gone digital. Yet, for the vast majority of people sending money home to friends and family in Africa, they are still doing it the way they have always done it: in cash.

10 innovations in qualitative research: Broadening the financial inclusion survey toolkit

Demand-side surveys (DSS) in financial inclusion are growing in popularity. These are surveys that focus on the consumers of financial services and, though this increase is encouraging, we find that existing DSS rely heavily on standard cross-sectional survey designs, and often ignore emerging qualitative survey techniques. Sticking to traditional methods is fine if we want to superficially cover a broad range of financial topics and get an aggregated measure of financial inclusion. However, limiting ourselves to focus groups and in-depth interviews can mean missing out on valuable data that will shed light on how best we can service low-income individuals with…
 

Blog

Measurement through the consumer lens

During my tenure at South Africa’s National Treasury, the discussions around financial inclusion often focused on seemingly straightforward questions: What is the state of financial inclusion in the country? What are the most critical areas requiring policy interventions? What targets are appropriate for what we want to achieve? How will we measure progress towards these targets? How will we evaluate the impact of our work when we reach, or don’t reach, these targets?

Then and now: Shaping our latest tools in financial inclusion

(Editor’s note: This is the first in a three-part series.)   “We shape our tools and thereafter our tools shape us” – Marshall McLuhan   In 2010, the leaders of the G20 launched the Global Partnership for Financial Inclusion (GPFI) at the G20 Summit in Seoul. It was a watershed moment for financial inclusion, which had evolved from a grassroots microfinance movement in the 1980s to a mainstream development agenda

Delivering on the promise of digitising payments in Zambia

Digital financial inclusion holds great promise. A McKinsey report last year found that digital finance could add up to $3.7 trillion to the GDP of emerging economies within a decade. A recent blog from the World Bank explains that the biggest impact from financial inclusion comes from digital payments and savings accounts. Studies on digitising cash payments in Brazil, South Africa and Mexico all find significant efficiency gains from digitising payments for governments and their service providers.

Cash is king for Africans sending money from the UK

The way we stay in touch, do our shopping, and even the ways in which some of us find love, have all gone digital. Yet, for the vast majority of people sending money home to friends and family in Africa, they are still doing it the way they have always done it: in cash.

10 innovations in qualitative research: Broadening the financial inclusion survey toolkit

Demand-side surveys (DSS) in financial inclusion are growing in popularity. These are surveys that focus on the consumers of financial services and, though this increase is encouraging, we find that existing DSS rely heavily on standard cross-sectional survey designs, and often ignore emerging qualitative survey techniques. Sticking to traditional methods is fine if we want to superficially cover a broad range of financial topics and get an aggregated measure of financial inclusion. However, limiting ourselves to focus groups and in-depth interviews can mean missing out on valuable data that will shed light on how best we can service low-income individuals with…
 

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