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Could this be microinsurance's uber moment?

Over the last decade, microinsurance has grown from covering fewer than 100 million risks, to covering more than 500 million. But are we overstating what this growth means for insurance market development?   The diagram below illustrates how an insurance market typically develops in a country: from initially just underwriting large corporate risks, such as insuring large-scale assets in the extractive industries; to expanding its early retail reach via compulsory insurance, employee groups and other group-based models; to gradually growing an individual and voluntary client base; before, eventually, covering a diversity of risks for the bulk of individuals.

Jumping to conclusions – How commonly held assumptions have skewed our view on women’s financial inclusion

Have you heard of the Fosbury Flop? Probably not. But you’d know one if you saw it. It’s the technique that high jumpers use when jumping back-first over high bars, commonly seen at the Olympics. It wasn’t always the accepted way of doing things, of course. Previously, athletes approached the bar front-on, and jumping over backwards was considered unconventional and clumsy. The consensus at the time was that jumping backwards could never lead to higher jumps. That was until Dick Fosbury came along and won gold, employing his namesake move at the 1968 Olympics. In doing so, he demonstrated that…

7 things I learned from the MiN field trip and workshop on microinsurance distribution

What if you could simply swipe your card every time you wanted to pay for a minibus taxi ride? That might be more convenient than carrying the right change in cash... But what about if you are automatically insured for the trip you’re about to take, as a result of using that card? Now that’s an incentive, isn’t it?   David de Croning, who presented at the recent Microinsurance Network regional workshop on microinsurance distribution, shared this, and other interesting ideas on how to crack the mass market for microinsurance. Fifty experts and professionals within the region’s microinsurance space came together in…

Reading between the data: Exploring the mismatch between the number of insurance policies reported by consumers vs. providers in Zambia

In 2014, 22.2% of adults in Zambia were covered by insurance. In 2015, just 2.6% were. If you are working on insurance in Zambia you would probably think the magnitude of this change was because of the discontinuing of the Airtel Life product. But even if you exclude Airtel Life from the 2014 data, it captures three times more insurance policies than the 2015 data. So why the mismatch? 

"I've got your back" - the role of mutualitées in the DRC

The Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) is a country with a volatile history and topography that’s tough to navigate. It’s not the easiest place to live when you consider the risks that you are exposed to on a regular basis. These might include sickness, unemployment, and unexpected expenses, but also more specific and remarkable challenges, such as buffalos trampling your crops. Now consider that insurance is mostly inaccessible. How would you ensure that you and your family cope?
 

Blog

Could this be microinsurance's uber moment?

Over the last decade, microinsurance has grown from covering fewer than 100 million risks, to covering more than 500 million. But are we overstating what this growth means for insurance market development?   The diagram below illustrates how an insurance market typically develops in a country: from initially just underwriting large corporate risks, such as insuring large-scale assets in the extractive industries; to expanding its early retail reach via compulsory insurance, employee groups and other group-based models; to gradually growing an individual and voluntary client base; before, eventually, covering a diversity of risks for the bulk of individuals.

Jumping to conclusions – How commonly held assumptions have skewed our view on women’s financial inclusion

Have you heard of the Fosbury Flop? Probably not. But you’d know one if you saw it. It’s the technique that high jumpers use when jumping back-first over high bars, commonly seen at the Olympics. It wasn’t always the accepted way of doing things, of course. Previously, athletes approached the bar front-on, and jumping over backwards was considered unconventional and clumsy. The consensus at the time was that jumping backwards could never lead to higher jumps. That was until Dick Fosbury came along and won gold, employing his namesake move at the 1968 Olympics. In doing so, he demonstrated that…

7 things I learned from the MiN field trip and workshop on microinsurance distribution

What if you could simply swipe your card every time you wanted to pay for a minibus taxi ride? That might be more convenient than carrying the right change in cash... But what about if you are automatically insured for the trip you’re about to take, as a result of using that card? Now that’s an incentive, isn’t it?   David de Croning, who presented at the recent Microinsurance Network regional workshop on microinsurance distribution, shared this, and other interesting ideas on how to crack the mass market for microinsurance. Fifty experts and professionals within the region’s microinsurance space came together in…

Reading between the data: Exploring the mismatch between the number of insurance policies reported by consumers vs. providers in Zambia

In 2014, 22.2% of adults in Zambia were covered by insurance. In 2015, just 2.6% were. If you are working on insurance in Zambia you would probably think the magnitude of this change was because of the discontinuing of the Airtel Life product. But even if you exclude Airtel Life from the 2014 data, it captures three times more insurance policies than the 2015 data. So why the mismatch? 

"I've got your back" - the role of mutualitées in the DRC

The Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) is a country with a volatile history and topography that’s tough to navigate. It’s not the easiest place to live when you consider the risks that you are exposed to on a regular basis. These might include sickness, unemployment, and unexpected expenses, but also more specific and remarkable challenges, such as buffalos trampling your crops. Now consider that insurance is mostly inaccessible. How would you ensure that you and your family cope?
 

 

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