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Equal access in ASEAN – illusion or reality?

This blog series stimulates a broader discussion on gendered financial inclusion in ASEAN. We examine why women’s access to financial services does not necessarily equate gendered usage. We further explore whether the value that women derive from financial services is impacted by the provider they access them from.   It is said that if women are able to achieve their full economic potential they could add between as much as US$12 trillion to $28 trillion dollars to the economy by 2025, contributing to between 11% and 26% of GDP. Gender inequality is both a moral, social and economic issue that features…

Completing the picture in ASEAN

This blog series seeks to generate a broader discussion on the data that is needed to close the gender gap in financial inclusion in ASEAN.   A previous blog post argued that the headline data available on financial inclusion in the ASEAN region – the percentage of women with access to a formal account – is by itself insufficient to understand if, and how, women derive value from formal financial services.

Rich enough for a discount?

Tax credits and employer subsidies are required to make medical schemes affordable for those earning just above tax threshold.   Pre-funded health financing mechanisms are important tools that can protect people against the financial risks of health events and provide access to private healthcare. Such protection is especially important in the low-income market where the majority of individuals cannot afford to pay large medical bills. Yet in South Africa only 16% of the population are members of medical schemes. 

The many face survey

Traditionally, survey data was collected by fieldworkers trekking across the country, knocking on doors and filling in paper questionnaires. As it sounds, it is possibly the slowest way of collecting data. However, recent advances in technology and data collection methodologies are changing this. More and more organisations are collecting data using innovative approaches that provide faster responses and quicker access to survey data.

Storming the Walls – How Mozambique's 'Citadel Economy' shapes financial inclusion

When I first travelled through Mozambique, the picture was idyllic. Leaving sprawling Maputo behind, my main impression was of beaches, coconut trees and serene dhows. Every now and then you pass through a small village. You plan your mileage carefully, or run the risk of being left to buy plastic bottles of fuel next to the road. You buy fish, tomatoes, onions and fresh pão bread from the local market, and stop to buy cashew nuts from roadside vendors. But you make sure to be stocked up on essentials, because formal shops are few and far between. And, of course, you…
 

Blog

Equal access in ASEAN – illusion or reality?

This blog series stimulates a broader discussion on gendered financial inclusion in ASEAN. We examine why women’s access to financial services does not necessarily equate gendered usage. We further explore whether the value that women derive from financial services is impacted by the provider they access them from.   It is said that if women are able to achieve their full economic potential they could add between as much as US$12 trillion to $28 trillion dollars to the economy by 2025, contributing to between 11% and 26% of GDP. Gender inequality is both a moral, social and economic issue that features…

Completing the picture in ASEAN

This blog series seeks to generate a broader discussion on the data that is needed to close the gender gap in financial inclusion in ASEAN.   A previous blog post argued that the headline data available on financial inclusion in the ASEAN region – the percentage of women with access to a formal account – is by itself insufficient to understand if, and how, women derive value from formal financial services.

Rich enough for a discount?

Tax credits and employer subsidies are required to make medical schemes affordable for those earning just above tax threshold.   Pre-funded health financing mechanisms are important tools that can protect people against the financial risks of health events and provide access to private healthcare. Such protection is especially important in the low-income market where the majority of individuals cannot afford to pay large medical bills. Yet in South Africa only 16% of the population are members of medical schemes. 

The many face survey

Traditionally, survey data was collected by fieldworkers trekking across the country, knocking on doors and filling in paper questionnaires. As it sounds, it is possibly the slowest way of collecting data. However, recent advances in technology and data collection methodologies are changing this. More and more organisations are collecting data using innovative approaches that provide faster responses and quicker access to survey data.

Storming the Walls – How Mozambique's 'Citadel Economy' shapes financial inclusion

When I first travelled through Mozambique, the picture was idyllic. Leaving sprawling Maputo behind, my main impression was of beaches, coconut trees and serene dhows. Every now and then you pass through a small village. You plan your mileage carefully, or run the risk of being left to buy plastic bottles of fuel next to the road. You buy fish, tomatoes, onions and fresh pão bread from the local market, and stop to buy cashew nuts from roadside vendors. But you make sure to be stocked up on essentials, because formal shops are few and far between. And, of course, you…
 

 

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