Blog

The many face survey

Traditionally, survey data was collected by fieldworkers trekking across the country, knocking on doors and filling in paper questionnaires. As it sounds, it is possibly the slowest way of collecting data. However, recent advances in technology and data collection methodologies are changing this. More and more organisations are collecting data using innovative approaches that provide faster responses and quicker access to survey data.

Storming the Walls – How Mozambique's 'Citadel Economy' shapes financial inclusion

When I first travelled through Mozambique, the picture was idyllic. Leaving sprawling Maputo behind, my main impression was of beaches, coconut trees and serene dhows. Every now and then you pass through a small village. You plan your mileage carefully, or run the risk of being left to buy plastic bottles of fuel next to the road. You buy fish, tomatoes, onions and fresh pão bread from the local market, and stop to buy cashew nuts from roadside vendors. But you make sure to be stocked up on essentials, because formal shops are few and far between. And, of course, you…

Insurance matters for capital market development – or does it really?

Does insurance matter for welfare and growth? Within the microinsurance discourse, the answer to this question is usually considered from the risk mitigation point of view: By helping people to mitigate risk, it makes them more resilient, thereby impacting on household welfare. Then there’s also an intermediation role. By acting as institutional investors, insurers aggregate domestic capital and mobilise it into long-term investments. Thus, it is commonly assumed that insurance strengthens capital market development for growth.   But what if it is not so straightforward? Recent research conducted on the link between insurance and capital market development across fifteen Sub-Saharan African countries…

Secure in Exclusion – early warning signs of a less inclusive financial sector in South Africa

Opening a bank account in South Africa can be a frustrating experience. First, you need to pull together an inventory of documents (proof of income, employment and address, national identify, passport, etc.), second you need to book time off work or make provision for an early Saturday (when banks operate), then you need to physically go to the Bank, wait in the queue, and hope that the Banks’ processes and systems will agree that you are in fact who you say you are. Hopefully this only takes one trip. More likely, it will be multiple trips. For example when a…

This road will not get you there

This week I drove 600km from Cape Town airport to my home and sheep farm in the rural Karoo. Whereas the drive was pleasant and gave me time to reflect on many things, the joy of driving was definitely not the purpose of this journey. Getting home to my family was the goal.   I have realised that much of our difficulties in making headway with financial inclusion links back to this confusion between the road and the destination. Financial services, such as bank accounts or mobile money accounts, are roads not destinations. We travel across them because we want to…
 

Blog

The many face survey

Traditionally, survey data was collected by fieldworkers trekking across the country, knocking on doors and filling in paper questionnaires. As it sounds, it is possibly the slowest way of collecting data. However, recent advances in technology and data collection methodologies are changing this. More and more organisations are collecting data using innovative approaches that provide faster responses and quicker access to survey data.

Storming the Walls – How Mozambique's 'Citadel Economy' shapes financial inclusion

When I first travelled through Mozambique, the picture was idyllic. Leaving sprawling Maputo behind, my main impression was of beaches, coconut trees and serene dhows. Every now and then you pass through a small village. You plan your mileage carefully, or run the risk of being left to buy plastic bottles of fuel next to the road. You buy fish, tomatoes, onions and fresh pão bread from the local market, and stop to buy cashew nuts from roadside vendors. But you make sure to be stocked up on essentials, because formal shops are few and far between. And, of course, you…

Insurance matters for capital market development – or does it really?

Does insurance matter for welfare and growth? Within the microinsurance discourse, the answer to this question is usually considered from the risk mitigation point of view: By helping people to mitigate risk, it makes them more resilient, thereby impacting on household welfare. Then there’s also an intermediation role. By acting as institutional investors, insurers aggregate domestic capital and mobilise it into long-term investments. Thus, it is commonly assumed that insurance strengthens capital market development for growth.   But what if it is not so straightforward? Recent research conducted on the link between insurance and capital market development across fifteen Sub-Saharan African countries…

Secure in Exclusion – early warning signs of a less inclusive financial sector in South Africa

Opening a bank account in South Africa can be a frustrating experience. First, you need to pull together an inventory of documents (proof of income, employment and address, national identify, passport, etc.), second you need to book time off work or make provision for an early Saturday (when banks operate), then you need to physically go to the Bank, wait in the queue, and hope that the Banks’ processes and systems will agree that you are in fact who you say you are. Hopefully this only takes one trip. More likely, it will be multiple trips. For example when a…

This road will not get you there

This week I drove 600km from Cape Town airport to my home and sheep farm in the rural Karoo. Whereas the drive was pleasant and gave me time to reflect on many things, the joy of driving was definitely not the purpose of this journey. Getting home to my family was the goal.   I have realised that much of our difficulties in making headway with financial inclusion links back to this confusion between the road and the destination. Financial services, such as bank accounts or mobile money accounts, are roads not destinations. We travel across them because we want to…
 

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