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"I've got your back" - the role of mutualitées in the DRC

The Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) is a country with a volatile history and topography that’s tough to navigate. It’s not the easiest place to live when you consider the risks that you are exposed to on a regular basis. These might include sickness, unemployment, and unexpected expenses, but also more specific and remarkable challenges, such as buffalos trampling your crops. Now consider that insurance is mostly inaccessible. How would you ensure that you and your family cope?

Equal access in ASEAN – illusion or reality?

This blog series stimulates a broader discussion on gendered financial inclusion in ASEAN. We examine why women’s access to financial services does not necessarily equate gendered usage. We further explore whether the value that women derive from financial services is impacted by the provider they access them from.   It is said that if women are able to achieve their full economic potential they could add between as much as US$12 trillion to $28 trillion dollars to the economy by 2025, contributing to between 11% and 26% of GDP. Gender inequality is both a moral, social and economic issue that features…

Rich enough for a discount?

Tax credits and employer subsidies are required to make medical schemes affordable for those earning just above tax threshold.   Pre-funded health financing mechanisms are important tools that can protect people against the financial risks of health events and provide access to private healthcare. Such protection is especially important in the low-income market where the majority of individuals cannot afford to pay large medical bills. Yet in South Africa only 16% of the population are members of medical schemes. 

Completing the picture in ASEAN

This blog series seeks to generate a broader discussion on the data that is needed to close the gender gap in financial inclusion in ASEAN.   A previous blog post argued that the headline data available on financial inclusion in the ASEAN region – the percentage of women with access to a formal account – is by itself insufficient to understand if, and how, women derive value from formal financial services.

The many face survey

Traditionally, survey data was collected by fieldworkers trekking across the country, knocking on doors and filling in paper questionnaires. As it sounds, it is possibly the slowest way of collecting data. However, recent advances in technology and data collection methodologies are changing this. More and more organisations are collecting data using innovative approaches that provide faster responses and quicker access to survey data.
 

Blog

"I've got your back" - the role of mutualitées in the DRC

The Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) is a country with a volatile history and topography that’s tough to navigate. It’s not the easiest place to live when you consider the risks that you are exposed to on a regular basis. These might include sickness, unemployment, and unexpected expenses, but also more specific and remarkable challenges, such as buffalos trampling your crops. Now consider that insurance is mostly inaccessible. How would you ensure that you and your family cope?

Equal access in ASEAN – illusion or reality?

This blog series stimulates a broader discussion on gendered financial inclusion in ASEAN. We examine why women’s access to financial services does not necessarily equate gendered usage. We further explore whether the value that women derive from financial services is impacted by the provider they access them from.   It is said that if women are able to achieve their full economic potential they could add between as much as US$12 trillion to $28 trillion dollars to the economy by 2025, contributing to between 11% and 26% of GDP. Gender inequality is both a moral, social and economic issue that features…

Rich enough for a discount?

Tax credits and employer subsidies are required to make medical schemes affordable for those earning just above tax threshold.   Pre-funded health financing mechanisms are important tools that can protect people against the financial risks of health events and provide access to private healthcare. Such protection is especially important in the low-income market where the majority of individuals cannot afford to pay large medical bills. Yet in South Africa only 16% of the population are members of medical schemes. 

Completing the picture in ASEAN

This blog series seeks to generate a broader discussion on the data that is needed to close the gender gap in financial inclusion in ASEAN.   A previous blog post argued that the headline data available on financial inclusion in the ASEAN region – the percentage of women with access to a formal account – is by itself insufficient to understand if, and how, women derive value from formal financial services.

The many face survey

Traditionally, survey data was collected by fieldworkers trekking across the country, knocking on doors and filling in paper questionnaires. As it sounds, it is possibly the slowest way of collecting data. However, recent advances in technology and data collection methodologies are changing this. More and more organisations are collecting data using innovative approaches that provide faster responses and quicker access to survey data.
 

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