Latest Publications

Homefield advantage: Learning from the popularity of local financial services providers

In the six countries where MAP was piloted, informal financial services persist despite an explicit push both globally and within the MAP countries to migrate consumers towards formal financial services. While it is increasingly acknowledged that informal services often offer benefits that formal services do not (such as accepting informal means of collateral like gold or jewellery, or providing more flexible terms), the persistence of informality is still commonly attributed to people having little to no alternative. Homefield advantage – learning from the popularity of local financial services providers is the third note to be published from the Global Insight series and shows there is increasing evidence that consumers rely on informal services even when they have access to formal alternatives. Why, despite the best efforts to increase usage of formal financial services, is this the case?

Depth sounding: Shifting measurement away from a one-dimensional view of financial inclusion

Depth sounding – shifting measurement away from a one-dimensional view of financial inclusion is the second note to be published from the MAP Global Insights series. It introduces a new approach to measuring financial inclusion. To the traditional emphasis on measuring ‘breadth’ – that is, the number of people using any type of formal financial service – the measurement framework adds a new indicator, ‘depth’: the number of different financial product classes used per person that reports accessing formal financial services. It expands on why such an approach is necessary in financial inclusion and applies it to the first six MAP pilot countries, highlighting the new insights it provides into the state of financial inclusion in a given market.

Making Access Possible (MAP) Nepal

Making Access Possible (MAP) Nepal was requested by the Government of Nepal as input towards the development of a financial inclusion strategy. It comes under the umbrella of the UNNATI-A2F (Access to Finance) programme implemented by Nepal Rastra Bank (NRB – the Central Bank of Nepal) and funded by the Government of Denmark, DFID and UNCDF in partnership with the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP). The Country Diagnostic Report was prepared by Beed management, with assistance from Cenfri.

Making Access Possible (MAP) Zimbabwe

Cenfri on behalf of FinMark Trust presented the key findings and recommendations from the Making Access to Financial Services Possible (MAP) Zimbabwe diagnostic report at the Stakeholder Workshop in Harare, Zimbabwe. The workshop was attended by representatives from a range of regulators, private sector institutions and media, as well as the Minister of Finance. It provided an opportunity for the MAP diagnostic team to test key findings with stakeholders and for stakeholders to provide feedback and comment on the findings for the final diagnostic report.

 
Latest Publications

Homefield advantage: Learning from the popularity of local financial services providers

In the six countries where MAP was piloted, informal financial services persist despite an explicit push both globally and within the MAP countries to migrate consumers towards formal financial services. While it is increasingly acknowledged that informal services often offer benefits that formal services do not (such as accepting informal means of collateral like gold or jewellery, or providing more flexible terms), the persistence of informality is still commonly attributed to people having little to no alternative. Homefield advantage – learning from the popularity of local financial services providers is the third note to be published from the Global Insight series and shows there is increasing evidence that consumers rely on informal services even when they have access to formal alternatives. Why, despite the best efforts to increase usage of formal financial services, is this the case?

Depth sounding: Shifting measurement away from a one-dimensional view of financial inclusion

Depth sounding – shifting measurement away from a one-dimensional view of financial inclusion is the second note to be published from the MAP Global Insights series. It introduces a new approach to measuring financial inclusion. To the traditional emphasis on measuring ‘breadth’ – that is, the number of people using any type of formal financial service – the measurement framework adds a new indicator, ‘depth’: the number of different financial product classes used per person that reports accessing formal financial services. It expands on why such an approach is necessary in financial inclusion and applies it to the first six MAP pilot countries, highlighting the new insights it provides into the state of financial inclusion in a given market.

Making Access Possible (MAP) Nepal

Making Access Possible (MAP) Nepal was requested by the Government of Nepal as input towards the development of a financial inclusion strategy. It comes under the umbrella of the UNNATI-A2F (Access to Finance) programme implemented by Nepal Rastra Bank (NRB – the Central Bank of Nepal) and funded by the Government of Denmark, DFID and UNCDF in partnership with the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP). The Country Diagnostic Report was prepared by Beed management, with assistance from Cenfri.

Making Access Possible (MAP) Zimbabwe

Cenfri on behalf of FinMark Trust presented the key findings and recommendations from the Making Access to Financial Services Possible (MAP) Zimbabwe diagnostic report at the Stakeholder Workshop in Harare, Zimbabwe. The workshop was attended by representatives from a range of regulators, private sector institutions and media, as well as the Minister of Finance. It provided an opportunity for the MAP diagnostic team to test key findings with stakeholders and for stakeholders to provide feedback and comment on the findings for the final diagnostic report.

 

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