Making Access Possible (MAP) Zimbabwe

Cenfri on behalf of FinMark Trust presented the key findings and recommendations from the Making Access to Financial Services Possible (MAP) Zimbabwe diagnostic report at the Stakeholder Workshop in Harare, Zimbabwe. The workshop was attended by representatives from a range of regulators, private sector institutions and media, as well as the Minister of Finance. It provided an opportunity for the MAP diagnostic team to test key findings with stakeholders and for stakeholders to provide feedback and comment on the findings for the final diagnostic report.

The findings included in the presentation were derived from a demand, supply and regulatory analysis based on the methodology developed by Cenfri, FinMark Trust and UNCDF as part of the global MAP initiative. The demand-side analysis draws from quantitative data provided by the Zimbabwe FinScope Consumer Survey 2011, the Zimbabwe FinScope Consumer Survey 2014, the Zimbabwe MSME Survey 2012 and primary qualitative research. The supply-side and regulatory analysis pulls data from interviews, mystery shopping and a range of industry documents.

 

Please click here to download the MAP Zimbabwe Synthesis Report (PDF, 1.54MB)

Please click here to download the MAP Zimbabwe Stakeholder Workshop Presentation (PDF, 1.89MB)

 

The presentation highlighted 7 key drivers impacting upon financial inclusion in Zimbabwe. These included:

  1. Declining income and employment depressing the use of formal financial services.
  2. Dutch disease, brought on by a strengthening US Dollar, is driving weak exports and strong imports undermining the productive potential of credit but driving cross-border payments. 
  3. Banks’ contribution to the retail financial market is declining requiring them to re-think their business models to regain ground.
  4. Payments and mobile money platforms now dominate the retail financial market landscape.
  5. Cross-border retail money flows are major growth area for Zimbabwe and fundamental for the economy and households to survive.
  6. Informal financial services are soaring as communities act collectively to survive.
  7. Private human capital development, specifically financial services to support education, remains a key priority for most Zimbabweans

The feedback and comments from the workshop will be incorporated into the final MAP diagnostic report which will be available later in 2016.

 

Making Access Possible (MAP) Zimbabwe

Cenfri on behalf of FinMark Trust presented the key findings and recommendations from the Making Access to Financial Services Possible (MAP) Zimbabwe diagnostic report at the Stakeholder Workshop in Harare, Zimbabwe. The workshop was attended by representatives from a range of regulators, private sector institutions and media, as well as the Minister of Finance. It provided an opportunity for the MAP diagnostic team to test key findings with stakeholders and for stakeholders to provide feedback and comment on the findings for the final diagnostic report.

The findings included in the presentation were derived from a demand, supply and regulatory analysis based on the methodology developed by Cenfri, FinMark Trust and UNCDF as part of the global MAP initiative. The demand-side analysis draws from quantitative data provided by the Zimbabwe FinScope Consumer Survey 2011, the Zimbabwe FinScope Consumer Survey 2014, the Zimbabwe MSME Survey 2012 and primary qualitative research. The supply-side and regulatory analysis pulls data from interviews, mystery shopping and a range of industry documents.

 

Please click here to download the MAP Zimbabwe Synthesis Report (PDF, 1.54MB)

Please click here to download the MAP Zimbabwe Stakeholder Workshop Presentation (PDF, 1.89MB)

 

The presentation highlighted 7 key drivers impacting upon financial inclusion in Zimbabwe. These included:

  1. Declining income and employment depressing the use of formal financial services.
  2. Dutch disease, brought on by a strengthening US Dollar, is driving weak exports and strong imports undermining the productive potential of credit but driving cross-border payments. 
  3. Banks’ contribution to the retail financial market is declining requiring them to re-think their business models to regain ground.
  4. Payments and mobile money platforms now dominate the retail financial market landscape.
  5. Cross-border retail money flows are major growth area for Zimbabwe and fundamental for the economy and households to survive.
  6. Informal financial services are soaring as communities act collectively to survive.
  7. Private human capital development, specifically financial services to support education, remains a key priority for most Zimbabweans

The feedback and comments from the workshop will be incorporated into the final MAP diagnostic report which will be available later in 2016.