Latest Publications

Beyond sales: New Frontiers in Microinsurance Distribution (2011)

The International Labour Organization’s (ILO) Microinsurance Innovation Facility (MIF) commissioned Cenfri to compare innovative distribution models from India, South Africa, Colombia and Brazil. The study was based on several case studies conducted and commissioned by Cenfri (click here to access the South Africa case studies). The aim was to create a typology for innovative microinsurance distribution channels and extract cross cutting lessons on successes and failures from both a consumer and business perspective.

Reviewing the regulatory framework for money transfers in South Africa (2010)

As economic hub of the region, South Africa attracts a large number of migrant workers from neighbouring countries, many of them without the necessary documentation and work permits. Regardless of their status, migrants send money home to families that are often dependent on these remittances for survival. Though the majority of South Africans are now banked, the SADC cross-border remittances economy remains largely informal. Informal remittances are not only risky and often expensive for the senders, but undocumented currency outflows on which no money laundering control can be exercised also present risk to the financial system.

 

Click here to download the full document (PDF:851KB)

Page 25 of 25
 
Latest Publications

Beyond sales: New Frontiers in Microinsurance Distribution (2011)

The International Labour Organization’s (ILO) Microinsurance Innovation Facility (MIF) commissioned Cenfri to compare innovative distribution models from India, South Africa, Colombia and Brazil. The study was based on several case studies conducted and commissioned by Cenfri (click here to access the South Africa case studies). The aim was to create a typology for innovative microinsurance distribution channels and extract cross cutting lessons on successes and failures from both a consumer and business perspective.

Reviewing the regulatory framework for money transfers in South Africa (2010)

As economic hub of the region, South Africa attracts a large number of migrant workers from neighbouring countries, many of them without the necessary documentation and work permits. Regardless of their status, migrants send money home to families that are often dependent on these remittances for survival. Though the majority of South Africans are now banked, the SADC cross-border remittances economy remains largely informal. Informal remittances are not only risky and often expensive for the senders, but undocumented currency outflows on which no money laundering control can be exercised also present risk to the financial system.

 

Click here to download the full document (PDF:851KB)

Page 25 of 25
 

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