Blog

Cash is king for Africans sending money from the UK

The way we stay in touch, do our shopping, and even the ways in which some of us find love, have all gone digital. Yet, for the vast majority of people sending money home to friends and family in Africa, they are still doing it the way they have always done it: in cash.

10 innovations in qualitative research: Broadening the financial inclusion survey toolkit

Demand-side surveys (DSS) in financial inclusion are growing in popularity. These are surveys that focus on the consumers of financial services and, though this increase is encouraging, we find that existing DSS rely heavily on standard cross-sectional survey designs, and often ignore emerging qualitative survey techniques. Sticking to traditional methods is fine if we want to superficially cover a broad range of financial topics and get an aggregated measure of financial inclusion. However, limiting ourselves to focus groups and in-depth interviews can mean missing out on valuable data that will shed light on how best we can service low-income individuals with…

The data effects of mobile money in Uganda

As you leave Kampala and its busy streets, you head into rural Uganda where you exchange small shops and boda-bodas for plots of coffee, maize, goats and chickens. More than 80% of the population lives here, and agriculture and its large cohort of smallholder farmers account for 23% of Uganda’s GDP.    Gimei Robert is one of these smallholder farmers in the Northern Region of Uganda, farming coffee on his one-hectare plot. Like most coffee farmers in Uganda, his income is erratic. Despite his collateral (his plot of land) and his knowledge of cashflow management, he doesn't have access to…

Save Me from Myself

Exploring the disconnect between providers and consumers of savings products in Zambia   “Yes, I do save. I have a bank account in Kabwe, two hours away.”   “Why so far away when there are banks here in Chisamba?”   “It keeps me disciplined! I know that if I have to travel two hours to make a withdrawal from my bank account, I will not squander the money.”   The above exchange between a female farmer and an interviewer was captured during the qualitative research for the Making Access Possible (MAP) study in Zambia. Although it may sound like an…

Farming for data in Kenya

Thoughts from the first event in the #DataHacks4FI meet-up series in Nairobi   In Kenya, agriculture is the second largest contributor to GDP and the largest supporter of livelihoods. 75% of the labour force in Kenya is employed in agriculture and 33% of all adults derive their main source of income from it. But agriculture remains largely out of reach for the financial sector. Only 4.3% of private sector credit goes to agriculture and farmers are amongst the least served by financial services in the country with even casual labourers reporting higher usage of mobile and banking services.   Agriculture…
 

Blog

Cash is king for Africans sending money from the UK

The way we stay in touch, do our shopping, and even the ways in which some of us find love, have all gone digital. Yet, for the vast majority of people sending money home to friends and family in Africa, they are still doing it the way they have always done it: in cash.

10 innovations in qualitative research: Broadening the financial inclusion survey toolkit

Demand-side surveys (DSS) in financial inclusion are growing in popularity. These are surveys that focus on the consumers of financial services and, though this increase is encouraging, we find that existing DSS rely heavily on standard cross-sectional survey designs, and often ignore emerging qualitative survey techniques. Sticking to traditional methods is fine if we want to superficially cover a broad range of financial topics and get an aggregated measure of financial inclusion. However, limiting ourselves to focus groups and in-depth interviews can mean missing out on valuable data that will shed light on how best we can service low-income individuals with…

The data effects of mobile money in Uganda

As you leave Kampala and its busy streets, you head into rural Uganda where you exchange small shops and boda-bodas for plots of coffee, maize, goats and chickens. More than 80% of the population lives here, and agriculture and its large cohort of smallholder farmers account for 23% of Uganda’s GDP.    Gimei Robert is one of these smallholder farmers in the Northern Region of Uganda, farming coffee on his one-hectare plot. Like most coffee farmers in Uganda, his income is erratic. Despite his collateral (his plot of land) and his knowledge of cashflow management, he doesn't have access to…

Save Me from Myself

Exploring the disconnect between providers and consumers of savings products in Zambia   “Yes, I do save. I have a bank account in Kabwe, two hours away.”   “Why so far away when there are banks here in Chisamba?”   “It keeps me disciplined! I know that if I have to travel two hours to make a withdrawal from my bank account, I will not squander the money.”   The above exchange between a female farmer and an interviewer was captured during the qualitative research for the Making Access Possible (MAP) study in Zambia. Although it may sound like an…

Farming for data in Kenya

Thoughts from the first event in the #DataHacks4FI meet-up series in Nairobi   In Kenya, agriculture is the second largest contributor to GDP and the largest supporter of livelihoods. 75% of the labour force in Kenya is employed in agriculture and 33% of all adults derive their main source of income from it. But agriculture remains largely out of reach for the financial sector. Only 4.3% of private sector credit goes to agriculture and farmers are amongst the least served by financial services in the country with even casual labourers reporting higher usage of mobile and banking services.   Agriculture…
 

Search for publications and events