Evolving insurance supervisory mandates in sub-Saharan Africa – implications for data practices

Evolving insurance supervisory mandates in sub-Saharan Africa – implications for data practices

September 30, 2020    

The Access to Insurance Initiative (A2ii) recently published the report, Evolving insurance supervisory mandates in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) – implications for data practices.” The report marks the first part of a project by the A2ii and Cenfri, in partnership with FSD Africa and together with a Steering Group comprising supervisors from seven jurisdictions: Ghana, Kenya, Malawi, Mauritius, Uganda and West and Central Africa (CIMA), chaired by South Africa.

The project was initiated to support SSA insurance supervisors with obtaining the necessary information to conduct effective supervision and evaluate the insurance market, in line with ICP 9 while recognising that supervisory mandates are evolving with the times.

The project aims to develop a consolidated reference list of KPIs covering the different ‘pillars’ of insurance supervisors’ mandates, namely:

  • prudential,
  • market conduct,
  • insurance market development (including inclusive insurance) and
  • the contribution of the insurance sector to sustainable development.
View the report Size 1.01 MB

For more resources on the topic visit the Monitoring and KPIs section of A2ii’s Knowledge Hub. Cenfri’s role in this work forms part of the Risk, Remittances and Integrity programme, a partnership between FSD Africa and Cenfri.

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