Welcome to the Centre for Financial Regulation and Inclusion (Cenfri)

Cenfri (The Centre for Financial Regulation & Inclusion) is an independent think tank based in Cape Town. Our mission is to support financial inclusion and financial sector development through facilitating better regulation and market provision of financial services. We do this by conducting research, providing advice and developing capacity building programmes for regulators, donors, financial service providers and other parties operating in the low-income market. In collaboration with key partners and funders we actively engage across Africa, Latin America and Asia.

 

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The king is (not) dead: Why digital payments are not replacing cash
The king is (not) dead: Why digital payments are not replacing cash Globally, the financial inclusion agenda has focused on migrating consumers, providers and governments to digital payment instruments, in a bid to reduce the cost of payments and to allow for the digitisation of other services for which payments are required (e.g. savings, credit and insurance). However, despite the increasing focus on and availability of digital or electronic payments, very few adult consumers in the six MAP countries are using digital instruments to meet their payment needs and cash remains the preferred payments options.
Mapping the DNA: Using consumer insights to unlock the potential of financial inclusion
Mapping the DNA: Using consumer insights to unlock the potential of financial inclusion In the first six MAP pilot countries, financial inclusion – contrary to popular belief and despite millions of programming dollars – has in many ways not lived up to its promises. If we move away from a one-dimensional view of financial inclusion as the percentage of adults with a formal bank account, we find that formal financial services are in fact having a limited impact on people’s lives (or in some cases leaving people worse off). Indeed, many bank accounts remain dormant for long periods at a time, or are used only for withdrawing cash once wages are deposited. Cash…
Cutting corners at a most vulnerable time: The customer's perspective on abuses in the informal funeral parlour market in South Africa
Cutting corners at a most vulnerable time: The customer's perspective on abuses in the informal funeral parlour market in South Africa With the details of the South African microinsurance regulatory framework soon to be finalised, questions still remain as to how best to approach formalisation and enforcement of informal funeral parlours. Previous research showed that enforcement will not be an easy task, as it is a fragmented industry where informal insurance is key to many parlours’ operations. Understanding the nature and extent of abuse is important in informing the enforcement response. Please click here to download the study (PDF, 1.03MB) This study investigated the nature of abuse in the informal funeral parlour market by talking to consumers themselves. It applied a…
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    Welcome to the Centre for Financial Regulation and Inclusion (Cenfri)

    Cenfri (The Centre for Financial Regulation & Inclusion) is an independent think tank based in Cape Town. Our mission is to support financial inclusion and financial sector development through facilitating better regulation and market provision of financial services. We do this by conducting research, providing advice and developing capacity building programmes for regulators, donors, financial service providers and other parties operating in the low-income market. In collaboration with key partners and funders we actively engage across Africa, Latin America and Asia.

     

    Read more...

     

    Search publications and events

     

    Recent publications and events 

    The king is (not) dead: Why digital payments are not replacing cash
    The king is (not) dead: Why digital payments are not replacing cash Globally, the financial inclusion agenda has focused on migrating consumers, providers and governments to digital payment instruments, in a bid to reduce the cost of payments and to allow for the digitisation of other services for which payments are required (e.g. savings, credit and insurance). However, despite the increasing focus on and availability of digital or electronic payments, very few adult consumers in the six MAP countries are using digital instruments to meet their payment needs and cash remains the preferred payments options.
    Mapping the DNA: Using consumer insights to unlock the potential of financial inclusion
    Mapping the DNA: Using consumer insights to unlock the potential of financial inclusion In the first six MAP pilot countries, financial inclusion – contrary to popular belief and despite millions of programming dollars – has in many ways not lived up to its promises. If we move away from a one-dimensional view of financial inclusion as the percentage of adults with a formal bank account, we find that formal financial services are in fact having a limited impact on people’s lives (or in some cases leaving people worse off). Indeed, many bank accounts remain dormant for long periods at a time, or are used only for withdrawing cash once wages are deposited. Cash…
    Cutting corners at a most vulnerable time: The customer's perspective on abuses in the informal funeral parlour market in South Africa
    Cutting corners at a most vulnerable time: The customer's perspective on abuses in the informal funeral parlour market in South Africa With the details of the South African microinsurance regulatory framework soon to be finalised, questions still remain as to how best to approach formalisation and enforcement of informal funeral parlours. Previous research showed that enforcement will not be an easy task, as it is a fragmented industry where informal insurance is key to many parlours’ operations. Understanding the nature and extent of abuse is important in informing the enforcement response. Please click here to download the study (PDF, 1.03MB) This study investigated the nature of abuse in the informal funeral parlour market by talking to consumers themselves. It applied a…
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